International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations

International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations

Postby jamescfm » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:29 pm

The International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations is an international scholarly organisation focused on the the interdisciplinary study of civilisations.
User avatar
jamescfm
 
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 3:41 pm
Location: Up In The Sky

Re: International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations

Postby jamescfm » Sat Jan 13, 2018 8:29 pm

The Heludis and their impact on modern Terran peoples
by Otto Wegmann

Attempts by linguists to group Terran languages based on their common ancestors have proved continually problematic for centuries. Early attempts to determine the people who spoke what is presently known in academia as "Old Heludic" were based principally on identifying cognates between languages and resulted in the proposed "Superseleyan" language family. With little historical evidence to supplement these attempts, it is no wonder that these initial proposals appear so inadequate to modern scholars. However understanding the fundamental flaws which led to this failure centuries ago can help us to prevent it happening as we continue to piece together the complex linguistic nature of our world.

Image
Approximate contemporary distribution of the Heludic languages (red) throughout Terra

The researchers behind the Superseleyan hypothesis believed that Proto-Superseleyan was an ancient language spoken primarily in modern Aldegar and that the Proto-Superseleyan people were most similar to modern Ezadi peoples. Although this appears now to be a bizarre proposition, it was not so at the time. While it contrasted the general wisdom of the day, which was that there was no relation between the Kalkali-Ezadi language family and the Artanian languages (such as Dundorfian and Luthorian) the early use of linguistic reconstruction was compelling for many. As a result, researchers and the public as a whole were quick to jump on board.

Over time academics developed a more thorough understanding of the nature and behaviour of languages and the model was revised. At times, these revisions caused extreme controversy and created vast divisions between contemporary scholars. The separation of the Sullestic languages from the Superseleyan family is the most prominent example of this, providing a valuable example of where proximity and perceived similarity do not necessarily indicate a direct relationship between languages. Even so, the most significant change was the suggestion that the Proto-Superseleyans weren't actually Seleyan at all, they were Artanian.

It brings us to the modern day and my own understanding of the Heludic languages. They are spoken on almost every continent and are the best understood group of languages, thanks to the increasing availability of historical evidence to supplement the linguistic work which is still being done. Among the major sub-divisions of the family are the Delic languages, the Selucic languages and the aforementioned Kalkali-Ezadi languages. Each of these sub-divisions are actually trans-continental in their own right, thanks to the vast empires and legendary migrations which carried them across Terra.

Little can be determined about the ancient Heludis for certain. It seems that patrilineality was present and there was worship of a "sky father" of some variety. What is true is that the Heludis had an intense desire to migrate. The Heludi homeland occupied the region which today forms south-eastern Dundorf, eastern Kundrati and western Ibutho/Hawu. From there, they spread south to modern Malivia and developed into the ancestors of Kalkali-Ezadis, to Majatra where the the Delic and the Selucic languages began their development and eventually they reached as far as Dovani. There is no denying that our understanding of the Heludis and the languages they provided us with will likely change in future but I'm similarly certain that they will remain among the most influential groups in Terran history.
User avatar
jamescfm
 
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 3:41 pm
Location: Up In The Sky

Re: International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations

Postby jamescfm » Sun Jan 14, 2018 10:41 am

Are we Altfolk or are we Kazulian?
by Björk Sigfastursdóttir

The ethnic, linguistic and cultural identities which people adopt are never logical. An inevitable consequence of the manner in which people groups develop, this can often mean that making sense of the people of a region is difficult to outsiders who become baffled by the difference between what groups call themselves, what they call each other and what they're called by the outside world. One popular example of this phenomenon is the Tokundian language. From a purely linguistic perspective, Tokundian is a single pluricentric language with three primary dialects and several smaller ones. Like any dialects, there are differences between these dialects but they are not nearly sufficient to consider them distinct languages. Nonetheless, the sectarian history of south Majatra has "created" as many as four different languages.

Less well-known but equally interesting examples of differing terminology exist in relation to the people of Kazulia and Telamon. For people living outside of these regions, understanding the terms that the people of these two countries use can be extremely difficult. A common misunderstanding is over the relationship between nationality and ethnicity in both countries. For example, the terms "Telamonian" and "Telamonese" generally refer to somebody who is a citizen of Telamon. It's chiefly an exonym and people from Telamon rarely use it to identify themselves except when explaining where they live. In contrast, the term "Kazulian" is often used to refer to specific ethnic groups.

Image
Map showing the eastwards expansion and migration of the early "East Dundorfic" peoples

If we are to properly understand these relationships, it helps to have an overview of the history of both regions and how they came to be inhabited by their current residents. Both countries are primarily inhabited by Dundorfic peoples and the map above highlights how this happened. Sometime in the first millennium, Dundorfic people living northern Artania (shown in red) began to expand into the continent of Makon. Initially, they probably occupied areas of modern Davostan and Hutori too but in modern times the only remaining descendants of these "East Dundorfic" people live in Telamon (shown in orange). The settlement of the island of Migadon came sometime shortly after this initial migration.

The time period between the East Dundorfic arrival in Makon and their later migration across to Dovani hasn't been established for certain but general opinion is that it was between two and three hundred years. In addition, the causes of this ambitious and dangerous expansion through modern Trigunia to what is now Dankuk and Kazulia are not known but it's entirely possible that it was motivated simply by the human desire to expand. As with their settlement in Makon, it's likely that there were East Dundorfic peoples in other regions of northern Dovani but in the present day they occupy the area shown in yellow on the map.

Nowadays, the term "East Dundorfic" is used almost exclusively in linguistics. Nobody in either Kazulia or Telamon refers to themselves as East Dundorfic. "Kazulian" is generally used to refer to the three primary Dundorfic ethnic groups in Kazulia: the Befäskars, the Kazuls and the Skrigeres. Occasionally, it is extended to include the Skjöld and the Doyingar but their geographic separation usually means this isn't the case. Meanwhile in Telamon, the term Altfolk (from the Skjöld "allt fólkið", meaning "all the people") is used to refer to all five of these ethnic groups. Due to its more inclusive nature, this term has recently seen an increase in popularity in Kazulia too by citizens attempting to foster a pan-Altfolk identity.

The differences between the five Altfolk groups are minimal. The three Kazulian groups speak languages which are generally mutually intelligible, with Kazulianisk often regarded as being "in between" the other two languages. Skjöldunga and Doyingar are not mutually intelligible when spoken but the two written languages have many similarities. In terms of religion, almost all Altfolk people are Hosian although there are differences in terms of denomination. Overall, it would not be surprising if the increasing ease of communication in modern Terra brought these people closer together culturally- perhaps even politically as Telamon attempts to re-establish its diplomatic presence.
User avatar
jamescfm
 
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 3:41 pm
Location: Up In The Sky


Re: International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations

Postby jamescfm » Mon Jan 15, 2018 4:48 pm

Governments continue to fail in their demographic data
by Maurice Ducas

The recording and long-term monitoring of the demographic breakdown of a national population is difficult within the context of a stable, liberal democracy; making sense of the converging identities of a country's citizens and simplifying this into terms which can be written on a booklet with a tick box is not a task to be envied. With that said, the proposition of having to do so within countries ravaged by conflict or disease is even more difficult, even if we assume that there is somebody in the world who views this as important enough to risk attempting it. When all of these factors coalesce, the result is centuries of poor and unreliable data on the history of populations.

Image
Countries which do not publish demographic data (purple) are failing the international community

In the present day, Terra is the most peaceful it has been for centuries and global living standards continue to rise. On the face of it, this would suggest that governments would be able to improve the accuracy and comprehensiveness of their demographic data. It's not the case. New research from the University of Belgae indicates that the statistical information published by governments, especially on languages and ethnicity, remains wildly inaccurate. Oftentimes, there are political reasons for understating or overstating the size or distribution of a people group. Nationalist political parties will choose to ignore minority populations who contradict their vision of a homogeneous state, for example.

Nonetheless, we cannot continue to allow political issues to interfere in our ability to discover the truth about our past and our present. Governments must to more in order to ensure that the data which they collect and publish presents a broadly accurate picture of the people who live within their borders. Until they do, it is the responsibility of those who are passionate about furthering the expanses of human knowledge and progress to fill the vacuum they leave. The ISSTC aim to fulfil this responsibility by publishing the data we collect which, although we lack the funds of most national governments, we feel is broadly accurate. In the short term, we will focus particularly on countries which publish no data at all and in future this will be extended further. It is our hope that we can improve the quality and quantity of demographic information across Terra.
User avatar
jamescfm
 
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 3:41 pm
Location: Up In The Sky

Re: International Society for the Study of Terran Civilisations

Postby jamescfm » Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:02 pm

Nautic languages: a linguistic jigsaw puzzle
by Aisyah bin Manjalara

In terms of their geographic spread and cultural diversity, few linguistic groups are as unique as the Nautic-speaking peoples. As a direct consequence of this spread and diversity, they perplexed academics for centuries. In the present-day, they continue to confuse many members of the general public and even some who identify as Nautic themselves. Historically, the Kinavean, Welang and various Ikpi groups were assumed to be the indigenous people of their regions but contemporary scholars agree that they, in fact, migrated from the continent of Temania. Alongside other groups like the Tropicans and Holonas, they form the Nautic peoples.

Image
Present distribution of Nautic languages (yellow) and regions where proto-Nautic was spoken (red) with overlap shown (orange)

One reason why the Nautics proved difficult to piece together is the lack of a shared culture. Although the early Nautic people likely shared traditions and religion, the various populations have been separated for so long that the impact of regional neighbours and subsequent settlement has caused a considerable differentiation. A prominent example of this is the adoption of Yazdism by the Ikpis of central Seleya. The close proximity of Aldegar, a country which has at times instituted the faith as a state religion, means that the ancient religious beliefs of the Ikpi have either been fused with Yazdism or disappeared entirely.

The key to discovering the truth about the history of the Nautic people lay in their language. In the last three centuries, numerous significant discoveries served to highlight the relationship between the Nautic languages. Previously, the impact of nearby foreign languages (such as Canrillaise in the case of the Kinavean) had led to an inaccurate picture of the similarities between the languages. As historic texts were unearthed and changes were made to the modelling of languages, the theory that the Nautics migrated out of Temania quickly became accepted within academic circles. Revisions have been made to these initial proposals- such as the inclusion of the Welang (who at one time were thought to be Gao-Indralan speaking)- but this has only added to the evidence in their favour.
User avatar
jamescfm
 
Posts: 1829
Joined: Sat Jul 02, 2016 3:41 pm
Location: Up In The Sky


Return to Organizations

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests