Human Rights Foundation

Organizations in the political sphere such as party organisations, pressure groups and political campaigns.

Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby jamescfm » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:57 am

Zeltser condemns "Revolutionary Tribunals" in Barmenistan

Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation Stefan Zeltser has spoken out to condemn the so-called "Popular Revolutionary Tribunals" orchestrated by the Barmenistani government. While detailed information is lacking due to the lack of independent reporting on the ground in Barmenistan, some sources identify the number of people killed for being labelled as "counterrevolutionaries, traitors or saboteurs" as being over 40,000. At present, the HRF are working alongside local groups, primarily Barmenistani Lawyers for Human Rights, to attempt to better understand the scale of the atrocities being perpetrated.

In his statement to journalists, Zeltser urged foreign governments to take immediate action against the Barmenistani Social Nationalist Party through economic and, if necessary, military means. He said; "Now is a time when governments in Majatra and across the rest of the globe must stand up for their values and make clear that mass slaughter of innocent civilians, especially when it is utilised as a means to silence criticism and eliminate opposition, is a crime which cannot go unpunished. Major economies must cease trading with Barmenistan, diplomats should be recalled and if it is necessary then military force must be considered to bring an end to these crimes against humanity".
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby jamescfm » Sun Nov 25, 2018 10:37 pm

McCaskey: "Utari Government Poised to Commit Genocide"

Eliza McCaskey, the Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation has made an urgent appeal to highlight the new "racial hierarchy" system of economic division currently being implemented in Utari Mosir. Commonly referred to as Unterbergerism, the theory suggests that the two largest ethnic groups in the country, Hulstrians and Utari people, have a particular role to fulfil in the economy and that those outside of this binary division are to be sent to specially constructed "training camps" to try and determine where they fit within society.

McCaskey has suggested that the division, aside from being abhorrent and racist, is a precursor to the genocide of minorities in the country and has called on governments to place immediate pressure on the Utari government through economic sanctions and diplomatic threats. She implied that the actions of President Unterberger were part of a wider trend in Dovani towards more authoritarian governments, providing recent developments in Suyu Llaqta as a further example.
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby jamescfm » Sat May 02, 2020 3:01 pm

Bianjie violence is symptom of larger problem, Hodari says
28 January 4750

Addressing the ongoing problems of ethnic violence in Bianjie, Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation Safiri Hodari has criticised the international community for persistent failings in relation to countries in the so-called "Third World". At a press conference in Hutori, Hodari condemned "in the strongest terms possible" the government in Bianjie amid allegations that the regime is perpetrating acts of extreme violence against minority communities while affirming the belief of many in the international community that reports of chemical weapons were likely to be government propaganda.

The regime in Bianjie was not the only target of Hodari's criticism, however. In his press conference, he reiterated concerns he has been raising for over a decade about the way that developing countries are viewed and treated by the international elite. The international response to the Bianjie violence has in some sense vindicated his concerns, with minimal humanitarian efforts but ongoing discussion and support for military intervention in the Security Council.

Hodari said, "All one has to do is think of the terms in which many in the developed world refer to countries like Bianjie, Hanzen, or Istapali. In many countries it's common to use the phrase "Third World" to refer to these countries, as though they exist at the bottom of some hierarchy of states. Discourse like this fuels the view that it's their responsibility to moderate or manage these countries in their transition to liberal, market economies, otherwise they are destined to be unmanageable centres of violence".

Under the leadership of Hodari, a former diplomat from Kurageri, the Human Rights Foundation has become increasingly concerned with issues of international justice. While still firmly committed to human rights on the individual level, the organisation has notably criticised the World Congress for the exclusion of certain countries from Security Council elections, including Hodari's home country. At present only fifty-eight countries are able to stand and vote in Security Council elections, with the remaining countries excluded for a host of historical and contemporary host of reasons.
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The Human Rights Foundation is a global non-profit organisation seeking to advance the causes of justice, freedom, truth and dignity.
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby jamescfm » Sat May 30, 2020 7:02 pm

Report on global democracy critical of major powers
15 January 4764

A new report from the Human Rights Foundation has attempted to measure the state of democracy in countries across the globe. Secretary-General Safiri Hodari held a press conference from Istalia to announced the report's findings and call on governments to put pressure on those countries who were found to be lacking. Among those countries criticised by the report are Security Council members Dorvik and Vanuku, while praise was reserved for countries like Tropica and Seko for their attempts to enshrine democratic pluralism in their national constitutions.

Unlike similar approaches in the past, the most recent report did not attempt to directly compare countries through a ranking system. Instead the approach was qualitative and involved detailed cataloguing of key measures such as freedom of expression, the existence of multiple political parties able to compete for power and an independent judicial system. Each country was analysed in significant detail, although a summary of key findings was presented to improve public access to the data.

In his press conference, Hodari focused particularly on some of the most powerful economic and military states in the world, saying "These countries that we are allowing to dictate the management of world affairs through the Security Council are among the most corrupt and undemocratic states in the world. Even when you don't have a situation like Dorvik in which a single party has cemented its power through legislation, measures in Vanuku and Trigunia among others actively discourage opposition to the governing regime. Such countries quite obviously should not be empowered to make decisions that have global repercussions".
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby KimDonghan » Mon Sep 28, 2020 8:50 am

Warm greetings:

We, the Nationalist Reform Party of the Dranian Federation, commends the Human Rights Foundation for their work across the globe to motivate governments, parties, and people alike to move for human decency, security, and lives. Their work is unparalleled and we are all impressed with their actions to push for the proper respect deserved by every human being.

Likewise, the NRP recognizes that the full rights of the people are yet to be realized in Dankuk, where even capital punishment is still permitted. We know the need that these acts of tyranny against humanity must be abolished in the near future. In lieu of that, we are grateful if the Human Rights Foundation will recognize us as their partner in Dankuk to help further their cause among the Dranian populace. We pledge, as we pledged to the people of Dankuk, to further the rights of every citizen and human being in our Federation, and even to the world.

Sincerely,

Kim Haesung
Party Leader (Candidate for Minister of Foreign Affairs)
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby jamescfm » Mon Oct 05, 2020 3:32 pm

Your Excellency Premier Kim Haesung,

Thank you for the kind words with regard to the actions and agenda of the Foundation, we are pleased and boosted to know that a significant figure in Dranian national politics such as yourself understands and supports the work that we perform around the globe.

Late congratulations are due to your party for a convincing election victory that reignited the spark of multi-party democracy in Dankuk, a country that has struggled in the past to achieve political stability. Even more impressive has been your immediate attempts to bring justice and equality to the country through the abolition of the death penalty.

With regard to your suggestion for partnership, our organisation would be delighted to work with your party in whatever manner you feel is appropriate in order to improve the position of human rights and freedom in your country. The only limitation on this partnership is that the Foundation will continue to work with other partners in Dankuk and the wider region where it is appropriate.

In recognition of this new partnership and in the spirit of frank and open exchange of dialogue, the Human Rights Foundation would like to recommend that your government consider repealing legislation that criminalises adultery. From historic antecedents and the application of laws in countries where they remain enforced, we know that such laws disproportionately target women and it would send a clear message to the world on gender equality if they were to be abolished.

Thank you for your correspondence and I look forward to your response.

Yours sincerely,

Mr. Ibezimako Nkemdilim
Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby KimDonghan » Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:54 pm

jamescfm wrote:Your Excellency Premier Kim Haesung,

Thank you for the kind words with regard to the actions and agenda of the Foundation, we are pleased and boosted to know that a significant figure in Dranian national politics such as yourself understands and supports the work that we perform around the globe.

Late congratulations are due to your party for a convincing election victory that reignited the spark of multi-party democracy in Dankuk, a country that has struggled in the past to achieve political stability. Even more impressive has been your immediate attempts to bring justice and equality to the country through the abolition of the death penalty.

With regard to your suggestion for partnership, our organization would be delighted to work with your party in whatever manner you feel is appropriate in order to improve the position of human rights and freedom in your country. The only limitation on this partnership is that the Foundation will continue to work with other partners in Dankuk and the wider region where it is appropriate.

In recognition of this new partnership and in the spirit of frank and open exchange of dialogue, the Human Rights Foundation would like to recommend that your government consider repealing legislation that criminalizes adultery. From historic antecedents and the application of laws in countries where they remain enforced, we know that such laws disproportionately target women and it would send a clear message to the world on gender equality if they were to be abolished.

Thank you for your correspondence and I look forward to your response.

Yours sincerely,

Mr. Ibezimako Nkemdilim
Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation


Addressed to Mr. Ibezimako Nkemdilim, Secretary-General, Human Rights Foundation

Warm greetings,

We are delighted to hear from you and we appreciate your applaud for the repeal of one of the most brutal actions a State may do to its citizens, murdering them.

Rest assured that we will continue to work for the abolition of penalties on adultery. However, the situations you shared are quite contrary in Dankuk, as our culture values "familial arrangements" regarding crimes involving marriage, including adultery. It is so rare that if a case on adultery reaches the court, it results in a national scandal.

Nonetheless, the party as well is contemplating on it and will continue to reform policies in ensuring equality and the rights of the people.

Lt. Gen. Kim Haesung (Ret.)
Premier, Dranian Federation
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby Wu Han » Sun Nov 22, 2020 10:14 pm

Letter from Ms. Okuno Kayoko and Dr. Sonoda Saburo of Seko to the Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation Mr. Ibezimako Nkemdilim,
1 June 4848:

Dear Secretary-General Nkemdilim,

For over 700 years, the Human Rights Foundation has stood at the vanguard of the struggle to advance justice, freedom, truth and dignity for all peoples throughout Terra. In recognition of this profound living legacy, we are writing to ascertain the Foundation’s interpretation of international human rights law (IHRL) at the present moment. We would be most honoured to receive guidance with respect to the questions posed below:

(A) Former HRF Secretary-General Stefan Zeltser once explained that the International Declaration of Human Rights “was the basis for what constituted essential human rights.” Given that this declaration has been lost to history, what currently constitutes the basis for essential human rights?

(B) How should the Declaration of Natural Human Rights (SC R100) be interpreted within the scope of international human rights law? What other legal precedents, if any, are relevant?

(C) What is the role of the World Congress in legislating international human rights law? What are the consequences of recognizing the World Congress as a body imbued with the authority to legislate international law?

We thank you for your consideration and time.

Best wishes in solidarity,

Ms. Okuno Kayoko, BA, MA, LLB.
Chairwoman of the Hasu Gakkai
President of the Sekowan Association for Human Rights

Dr. Sonoda Saburo, LLB, LLM, SJD, PhD.
Dean of the Ito Makiko Law School (Nago National University)
Research Chair in International and Transnational Legal Studies
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby jamescfm » Thu Nov 26, 2020 3:29 am

Ms. Okuno and Dr. Sonoda,

Thank you for your letter and for your commitment to the cause of international justice and human rights. The role of the Human Rights Foundation is important in the context of global justice and rights issues but it is sustained only with the support of partner organisations and individuals throughout the world like yourselves.

Attempting to strengthen international human rights law is a key objective of the Human Rights Foundation (as I am sure you are both aware). Recent years have proven frustrating on this front, as the international community has largely fractured and human rights issues have been challenged primarily at the national level or by non-governmental organisations, rather than by states applying pressure to those who fail in their duty to provide freedom and justice for their citizens.

With respect to your specific questions, the principles that were foundational to the International Declaration of Human Rights remain the guiding principles of the Human Rights Foundation. No codified statement of these principles and associated rights exists within the international sphere since the abrogation of that document and it is an important aim of the Foundation to pursue the creation of such a document, which might serve as a focus for our campaigning efforts.

In the current legal context Security Council Resolution 100 is the most significant statement of global rights and you are right to highlight it. Leaving aside the lack of enforcement of its provisions, the broad agreement on the principles that it laid out remains a positive symbol of the potential for international co-operation regarding human rights. In spite of this we cannot say that the resolution is perfect and the restrictive language regarding the use of promotion of human rights abroad is particularly problematic.

Outside of this there are a number of international treaties that outline states' duties with respect to the fundamental rights of citizens that are only partially enforced. Nonetheless many of these treaties have served an important function in providing a focus for the work of human rights campaigns as well as shaping subsequent international agreements. Consider the Declaration on the Rights of Disabled Persons for a key example of such an agreement.

A matter of persistent concern in the sphere of international human rights is the approach that organisations should take to the role of the World Congress. On the face of it the World Congress represents a genuine miracle in international relations, in that it has managed to convene representatives of every country on the globe in the same room consistently for centuries. At the same time there has been only marginal improvement in the state of international human rights in that period.

In recent times there have been positive developments in the World Congress, such as the inclusion of all of the countries of Dovani, Temania and Vascania and the abolition of the permanent members. Even so the Security Council in particular has been slow to take action in many instances of rights abuse and the action that it does take tends to be motivated by political and economic self-interest and not global justice. From the perspective of the Foundation, we continue to work with the World Congress in certain capacities and hope that it will continue to take positive steps, however it will not move forward the agenda of human rights alone.

I hope this response shines some light on the work of the Human Rights Foundation and its perspective on international human rights law.

Regards,

Mr. Ibezimako Nkemdilim
Secretary-General of the Human Rights Foundation
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Re: Human Rights Foundation

Postby Drax » Thu Nov 26, 2020 3:47 pm

Foreign Minister Salman Duqaq, Jumhuriat al-Badara

Jumhuriat al-Badara is not a member of this organization and apologizes for any failure of protocol. We believe the insightful discussion between the Secretary General and others is an important contribution to beginning to suggest an actual ethic in international relations which is rarely visible.

We would note at the time of the long overdue termination of the veto and "permanent" member concept, the other primary issue was sovereignty and the lack of respect for it then rampant. Despite the absence of agreement over what sovereignty means and the recognition that some treat it as meaning their nation gets to do what it pleases no matter how repugnant to humanity or one's God; we would suggest there is a role for the Security Council and the World Congress in promoting human decency which respects sovereignty.

Terminating a national government by an outside power is a truly grave matter. Obviously, when ignoring sovereignty is acceptable is a matter in dispute. We would suggest our view - when a nation attacks another or is conducting genocide within its borders are clear cases to us when sovereignty ceases to be important. Torture and the slave trade are less clear but not beyond the pale. We will not have universal agreement on others.

In cases short of genocide which are human rights abuses there are many things the nations of Terra can do together. Where, in the World Congress and through the Security Council. First there is condemnation. Some will change when branded as a pariah. Then there are tariffs, other economic sanctions, isolation which again may well cause change. Then there is diplomacy. Sometimes prejudicial action is for a reason that can be eliminated or alleviated by outside assistance or counsel particularly when approached from a position other than exaggerated moral outrage.

So we do believe there is much good that can be done through the World Congress.
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